one tsp of baking powder

25Apr09

The second I woke up today, I knew that I wanted a traditional American breakfast menu like french toast, PB&J sandwich, waffles, or even simple scones.  The bad news was that none of them were available at home.  No where in the house were there any left over bread of bake-mix that I could use to whip up something real quick.

http://www.qualityhotelwinnipeg.com/images/HotBreakfastNew-b.jpg

BUT, being the desperate food-girl that I am, I immediately turned on my macbook and searched for one of the simplest and quickest recipes: pancakes!

After typing in foodnetwork.com, I searched for easy pancake recipes.  What I noticed though, was that all the recipes required way too much sugar (no wonder store-bought pancakes or the ones at in-and-out taste so good!!!).  Then there was one recipe called, “Dutch Pancakes.” I simply clicked on it, and it only asked for 3 tsp of sugar.  That totally caught my attention, so I wrote the recipe down and went right to my kitchen to mix all the ingredients up.

The putting-together of this recipe barely took me 5 minutes.  Toss in some milk, flour, egg, and 3 tsp of sugar, the batter was ready to  be cooked.  What I didn’t quite realize at this point was its ‘extreme’ lack of sweetnessOther recipes required at least a 1/4 cup of sugar for 3/4 of flour, while this dutch pancake only required 3 tsp of sugar for 1 cup of flour.  I perhaps should have paused for a second and added a little more sugar to it, using my math knowledge.

Anyhow, the bigger problem was yet to approach.  I was putting the recipe together around 6:30 am in the kitchen all by myself.   My Mom woke up soon and decided to help me out with the actual cooking process.  So, ladle by ladle, my Mom and I both started to cook this simple and quick pancake.

The cooking was going pretty well, until my Mom asked, “Did you put the baking powder in?

Huh?” I replied.  Then I remembered.  In order for the bread (or any type of cakes) to be nice and fluffy, baking powder is THE agent to make that happen.

My palm directly tapped my forehead (like the scenes you see in cartoons when a character forgets something) and I added a tsp of baking powder to the rest of the batter.  I knew it was late to turn the ones that have already cooked into airy pancakes.http://www.fmft.net/doh%20homer%20simpson%20doh.jpg

When my Mom finished cooking those dutch pancakes, the difference between the ones with the baking powder and the ones without was so evident.  Not that the dutch pancakes didn’t taste good, but it wasn’t the original taste and texture of pancakes that I was expecting.   The Dutch pancakes had the same taste as the American pancakes, other than its lack of sweetness.

http://www.blueberrypancakerecipe.com/the_basic_pancake_recipe.html

http://www.foodtv.ca/DMM/D/U/Dutch_Pancakes_003.jpgEven through the pictures above (gosh, I wish I would have taken my own photo 😦) the difference in thickness can be easily spotted.  The regular pancakes that we’re familiar with (left) is looking nice and fluffy, whereas the dutch pancakes on the left are thinner and lighter in color too.

What a difference a teaspoon of baking powder can make!

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